Published: 20150103

This Bridge Called My Back

by Cherríe Moraga (Author, Editor), Gloria Anzaldúa (Editor)

This book is a manifesto―the 1981 declaration of a new politics ‘US Third World Feminism.’ No great de-colonial writer, from Fanon, Shaarawi, Blackhawk, or Sartre, to Mountain Wolf Woman, de Beauvoir, Saussure, or Newton could have alone proclaimed this ‘politic born of necessity.’ This politic denies no truths: its luminosities drive into and through our bodies. Writers and readers alike become shape-shifters, are invited to enter the shaman/witness state, to invoke power differently. ‘US Third World Feminism’ requires a re-peopling: the creation of planetary citizen-warriors. This book is a guide that directs citizenry shadowed in hate, terror, suffering, disconnection, and pain toward the light of social justice, gender and erotic liberation, peace, and revolutionary love. This Bridge … transits our dreams, and brings them to the real. ― Chela Sandoval, University of California, Santa Barbara

A poet, playwright, and cultural activist, Cherríe Moraga is Artist in Residence in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies and in the Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity Program at Stanford University. She is the author of many books, including A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000–2010 and Loving in the War Years: Lo que nunca pasó por sus labios.

Gloria Anzaldúa (1942–2004) was a poet, metaphysical philosopher, and scholar of Chicana cultural theory, feminist theory, and queer theory. Her books include Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza and The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader, a posthumously published collection of her work.

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